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Violent clashes between the Myanmar military and anti-coup protesters in the wake of the junta’s coup that removed Aung San Suu Kyi from power has displaced around 250,000 people, according to a UN envoy monitoring the situation.

Releasing a statement on Twitter, UN Special Rapporteur Tom Andrews called the situation in the country a “humanitarian catastrophe,” claiming that the “junta’s attacks have already left nearly a quarter million Myanmar people displaced.”

Violence in response to anti-coup demonstrations has become a daily occurrence in the country, with citizens rising up against the military’s attempts to secure a firm grip on power. Footage on social media has shown tear gas and grenades being thrown by the army, as well as bullets fired at protesters. 

The Karen National Union, a political group in Myanmar, similarly claimed that individuals targeted by the military’s offensive have fled across the border into Thailand or are hiding in the jungle after being forced to flee their homes.

The aggressive response to protests has sparked the so-called ‘Red Movement’, with activists smearing red paint on streets and buildings to symbolize those lost in the recent fighting.

The remarks from the UN official come after at least 738 people were killed, many more were injured and over 3,300 individuals have been detained, according to a monitoring group in the country.

Myanmar has been in the midst of a violent crackdown from the military since February 1, when the army seized control of the country, arresting civilian leader Suu Kyi and members of her political party, which recently defeated the junta-aligned opposition in the nation’s elections.

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FILE PHOTO. Protesters taking part in a demonstration against the military coup in Dawei's Launglone township on April 15, 2021, DAWEI, MYANMAR. © AFP / DAWEI WATCH
Deposed Myanmar officials and pro-democracy protesters form national unity government amid military coup

Asian leaders and their foreign ministers, including Min Aung Hlaing, who led the junta’s coup, are set to meet in Jakarta on Saturday to discuss the evolving situation in Myanmar, with the aim of finding a peaceful resolution to the situation.

The Myanmar military has defended its actions since the coup, claiming the November election that handed power to Suu Kyi’s party was marred by election fraud, with over 10 million votes missing or falsified. The army’s claims haven’t been verified and the country’s election commission has rejected the allegations. Once the existing state of emergency, which could last up to two years, has ended, the junta has pledged to hold a “free and fair general election.”

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Violent clashes between the Myanmar military and anti-coup protesters in the wake of the junta’s coup that removed Aung San Suu Kyi from power has displaced around 250,000 people, according to a UN envoy monitoring the situation.

Releasing a statement on Twitter, UN Special Rapporteur Tom Andrews called the situation in the country a “humanitarian catastrophe,” claiming that the “junta’s attacks have already left nearly a quarter million Myanmar people displaced.”

Violence in response to anti-coup demonstrations has become a daily occurrence in the country, with citizens rising up against the military’s attempts to secure a firm grip on power. Footage on social media has shown tear gas and grenades being thrown by the army, as well as bullets fired at protesters. 

The Karen National Union, a political group in Myanmar, similarly claimed that individuals targeted by the military’s offensive have fled across the border into Thailand or are hiding in the jungle after being forced to flee their homes.

The aggressive response to protests has sparked the so-called ‘Red Movement’, with activists smearing red paint on streets and buildings to symbolize those lost in the recent fighting.

The remarks from the UN official come after at least 738 people were killed, many more were injured and over 3,300 individuals have been detained, according to a monitoring group in the country.

Myanmar has been in the midst of a violent crackdown from the military since February 1, when the army seized control of the country, arresting civilian leader Suu Kyi and members of her political party, which recently defeated the junta-aligned opposition in the nation’s elections.

Also on rt.com
FILE PHOTO. Protesters taking part in a demonstration against the military coup in Dawei's Launglone township on April 15, 2021, DAWEI, MYANMAR. © AFP / DAWEI WATCH
Deposed Myanmar officials and pro-democracy protesters form national unity government amid military coup

Asian leaders and their foreign ministers, including Min Aung Hlaing, who led the junta’s coup, are set to meet in Jakarta on Saturday to discuss the evolving situation in Myanmar, with the aim of finding a peaceful resolution to the situation.

The Myanmar military has defended its actions since the coup, claiming the November election that handed power to Suu Kyi’s party was marred by election fraud, with over 10 million votes missing or falsified. The army’s claims haven’t been verified and the country’s election commission has rejected the allegations. Once the existing state of emergency, which could last up to two years, has ended, the junta has pledged to hold a “free and fair general election.”

If you like this story, share it with a friend!

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